Sketchbook Roundup 2019 - Weeks 9 & 10

Sketchblog Sketchbook Roundup 2019

You guys, it’s done. My interactive book report on Owen Jones’ “Grammar of Ornament” is complete. 105 re-designs (I miscounted originally), 6 weeks, now put to bed. But first! The final 35:
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Chinese Ornament:
As a disclaimer, I don’t care too much for Jones’ assessments anymore. I don’t find them incredibly helpful. For example, he says of Chinese Ornament, “In their decoration, both painted and woven, the Chinese exhibit only just so much art as would belong to a primitive people.”
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Another example: “...the Chinese are totally unimaginative, and all their works are accordingly wanting in the highest grace of art, —the ideal.”
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As I read these types of things, as I have multiple times while studying this book, I’m wondering if Jones was aware of just how many advancements came from China. (Paper, porcelain, gunpowder, the compass, tea, iron and steel smelting, the darn seismograph?) And I’m wondering if my modern bias is too great, especially when pitted against his 1800’s model. Ah, well.
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From porcelain.
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From woven fabrics.
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From conventional renderings of flowers painted on porcelain.
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Celtic Ornament
Which Jones (predictably) considers top of the heap. He says, “The genius of the British Islands has, in all ages, been indicated by productions of a class or style singularly at variance with those of the rest of the world.” He’s so full of hogwash.
I might just skip over his malarkey from here on out, if you don’t mind. It’s almost not worth reiterating. But we’ll continue with the designs!
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Ornament on the Cross in the Churchyard of Meigle, Angusshire.
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Ornament from the Sacramentarium of Rheims. 9th or 10th century.
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Initial Letter, from the Gospels of Lindisfarne. End of 7th century.
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Diagonal patterns, from Gospel of Lindisfarne.
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One quarter of frame or border, from the Arundel Psalter, No. 155.
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Medieval Ornament
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Stained glass from Cathedral of Soissons.
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Stained glass from St. Cunibert, Cologne.
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Stained glass from Cathedral of Bourges.
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Renaissance Ornament
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Ornament from the faience, or enameled earthenware, of Bernard de Palissy.
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From 'faience' of the 16th century.
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From enameled earthenware.
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From silk embroidery on velvet.
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Elizabethan Ornament
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From damask cover to a chair at Knowle, in Kent. James I.
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Appliqué needlework, James I or Charles I, in the collection of Mr. Mackinlay. The (original) ground in dark red; the ornament in yellow silk; outline, yellow silk cord.
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Needlework tapestry, Elizabeth. Also from the collection of a certain Mr. Mackinlay. The (original) ground, light green; the subject in light yellow, blue, or green; the outline, yellow silk cord.
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Wood carving, from Montecute, in Somersetshire. Elizabeth.
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Wood carving, from a pew, Pavenham Church, Bedfordshire. James I.
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Italian Ornament
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A series of arabesques painted in fresco by Giovanni da Udine, Perino del Vaga, Giulio Romano, Polidoro da Caravaggio, Francesco Penni, Vicenzio da San Gimignano, Pellegrino da Modena, Bartolomeo da Bagnacavallo, and possibly other artists, from designs by Raffaelle, selected from the decorations of Loggie, or central open Arcade of the Vatican, Rome and the Palazzo Ducale at Mantua.
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Leaves and Flowers from Nature
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Horse chestnut leaves.
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Vine leaves
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Wild rose
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Honeysuckle
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Passion flowers
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Aaaannndddd, I’m out. I’m sure I’ll do something with all these designs sooner or later or at some point in between, but right now I’m just glad to be finished, and truly hopeful that you have enjoyed this journey!
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Although I found Owen Jones to be narrow minded, I am so grateful for his contribution with this vast collection of designs. If you want to see the originals and many hundreds more, check out the book. Then you can see how my remixes stack up or at least complement the real deals.
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Byeee for now! Enjoy your (ever-increasingly spring-y!) weekend.

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